What To The Slave Is The Fourth of July by Frederick Douglass    
BlackState.com
Loved and Feared

 
Search BlackState.com

WWW BlackState.com

 
  | About Us |    HOME   |  Departments | Features and Interviews | Featured Columnist | Poetry Corner | | BlackState.NET | BlackState Gear |   | | |    
Top Story

DouglassWhat to the American Slave is Your Fourth of July? by Frederick Douglass

The full article is now available as a Digital Download! The Download Also Includes The Famous Letter To My Old Master Available Exclusively Here For Only $1.00
Support independent publishing: Buy this multimedia on Lulu.

But, such is not the state of the case. I say it with a sad sense of the disparity between us. I am not included within the pale of this glorious anniversary! Your high independence only reveals the immeasurable distance between us. The blessings in which you, this day, rejoice, are not enjoyed in common. The rich inheritance of justice, liberty, prosperity and independence, bequeathed by your fathers, is shared by you, not by me. The sunlight that brought life and healing to you, has brought stripes and death to me. This Fourth [of] July is yours, not mine. You may rejoice, I must mourn. To drag a man in fetters into the grand illuminated temple of liberty, and call upon him to join you in joyous anthems, were inhuman mockery and sacrilegious irony. Do you mean, citizens, to mock me, by asking me to speak to-day? If so, there is a parallel to your conduct. And let me warn you that it is dangerous to copy the example of a nation whose crimes, lowering up to heaven, were thrown down by the breath of the Almighty, burying that nation in irrecoverable ruin! I can to-day take up the plaintive lament of a peeled and woe-smitten people!


Fellow-citizens; above your national, tumultous joy, I hear the mournful wail of millions! whose chains, heavy and grievous yesterday, are, to-day, rendered more intolerable by the jubilee shouts that reach them. If I do forget, if I do not faithfully remember those bleeding children of sorrow this day, "may my right hand forget her cunning, and may my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth!" To forget them, to pass lightly over their wrongs, and to chime in with the popular theme, would be treason most scandalous and shocking, and would make me a reproach before God and the world. My subject, then fellow-citizens, is AMERICAN SLAVERY...

There Is More! The full article is now available as a Digital Download! The Download Also Includes The Famous Letter To My Old Master Available Exclusively Here For Only $1.00
Support independent publishing: Buy this multimedia on Lulu.



BlackState.com Home